Internet Marketing

Vidello Review (Marketing and Video Plattform)

This is my Review about the new Product by Josh Ratta called Vidello. Please read carefully through the end of this Review so that you have the full picture about this Product.

vidello-review

Review Summary


Product Name:

Vidello

Product Type:

Video and Marketing Plattform/Tool

Price:

starts with $27 per month

Summary:

Video and Marketing Together are very strong in Vidello and compared to other streaming plattforms, the price is a steal.

Rating:

What is Vidello?

With video being the most important conversion booster on all sales pages & funnels, it makes no sense not to use a professional hosting and marketing solution. Being able to instantly stream your message, A/B split-test, analyse how your video is performing, as well as add on pro call-to-actions to enhance the sales process is now all available inside of Vidello!

Although there are other options you are either left with very expensive video hosting platforms such as Wistia costing $99 -299 p/m, or the limited features & slow hosting of Vimeo. We decided to create the first advanced video hosting & marketing platform, specifically designed for the marketing community at a super affordable price. Giving you the ability to securely host and stream videos for your sales funnels and membership sites in one beautifully designed video platform.

Why Vidello is different from other Video and Marketing Platforms:

  • It's cost effective
  • Vidello is fastest streaming online
  • Vidello streams the videos instantly (with no loading time)
  • There are Post video production possibilities with third animations & note box animations
  • Test your the success of your Video with A/B Split Tests
  • Advanced marketing analytics
  • Clickable call-to-action Slides for eCommerce
  • Vidello integrates Coupons, Email Forms, Text Links, Buy Now Call-to-Action Buttons

Books about Marketing you need to read this Summer

Summer is right around the corner, so you are probably making a list of marketing books to add to your rotation.

I know summer is usually about relaxation and taking a load off, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t catch up on some reading that could have a huge impact on your business and marketing practices and your success.

Here I’ve listed a few of the best marketing books out there right now for you to take along wherever your summer vacation leads you.

Newly released “Top of Mind” has been getting a lot of attention as one of the best marketing and leadership books to help you build better business relationships. It starts off as a step-by-step guide to building lasting trust before discussing how you can use content to scale that trust to reach and engage large audiences. John is one of the dynamic marketing speakers who loves to educate others, and you see that in this book.

Affiliate marketing isn’t a channel that most people easily understand or know a ton about. Even most marketers find its method hard to grasp. But in Robert Glazer’s new book, he dives into the roots of the industry, describing what motivated it, where it’s headed, and why it should be one of the top marketing initiatives you use for your company.

So many companies claim to be consumer-focused and to put their consumers first. Consumers, however, seem to disagree. In Jay Baer’s marketing book, he describes what you should and shouldn’t be doing, as well as how customer service translates beyond phone and email in the modern world.

What makes for an effective advertising strategy? So many brands spend unnecessary amounts of money on traditional forms of advertising and generate far less return than if they were just doing what everyone in the marketing world is talking about: content marketing. In Marcus Sheridan’s book, he describes why high-quality content and digital marketing is the missing link in your advertising strategy.

I think most people can agree that who you become has everything to do with the path you took to get there. In Elise Mitchell’s book, she shares her journey to success in entrepreneurship and brand-building — and how what she learned can help you discover your own road to success.

After studying 150 strategic moves over more than 100 years and across 30 industries, business gurus W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne explain what all lasting successes have in common: tapping into new market spaces ripe for growth. Kim and Mauborgne refer to this as creating “blue oceans” in which marketers can carve their own spheres outside the cutthroat market. As your competitors fight over a shrinking market pool, you’ll have the tools to execute a winning strategy.

Article Source: https://marketinginsidergroup.com/strategy/marketing-books-summer-reading-list/
On – 26 May, 2017 By Michael Brenner

How to take your Biz from Draft to Profitable in no time

When I was a senior in college, I pitched my undergraduate capstone project as such: I was going to start a business . . . on paper. As a marketing major stuck in an artsy honors program, my capstone project options were limited to literature seminars or the like. So, I tracked down my favorite marketing professor and begged her to customize a syllabus for me.

About a month into my project, I had another ridiculous epiphany. Hey, I thought, let’s do this for real. I had a mentor, I was already starting this business on paper, and I’d grown up around the concept. Why not turn this into a real party?

So, my business gained a name, a face and a website. And I gained a title of ownership and a responsibility to deliver. Well, turns out I didn’t have all the resources I needed: My budget was zilch. I may have been working a part-time paid internship, but I was still in school and didn’t live with my parents. (Go me!)

Many small businesses with tight budgets believe that marketing spend should be the first to go. I was no different. But, I refused to limit myself to through-the-roof traditional advertising expenses. So, I got creative.

Here’s how I grew my business from paper (literally) to profitable with little to no marketing spend.

1. Network like crazy.

I worked my network. At 21, my measly network consisted of my mom and dad, my hair stylist, my college professors (that actually liked me) and my friends’ parents. But, you’d be surprised at how many people will help out a young entrepreneur. Once I built up the courage to cold call and email strangers I found online or through friends, many were willing to hear my story, give me advice and even leverage their networks on my behalf. (I even got a little mention in our local paper.)

2. Partner with other local businesses.

I traded advertising and exposure. Thankfully, I live in an area that celebrates local startups and where small business owners support each other. Since my business’s target audience is well-defined (which is important), I contacted non-competing businesses that market to similar clientele and offered cross-promotional opportunities. Even those small businesses that have plenty of marketing spend love free advertising.

3. Be smart about email marketing.

I emailed the heck out of people. Man, oh man, are emails annoying. I was apprehensive to use email with my business, but the truth is email marketing is hardly dead. So, I chose a free email marketing software, placed a web form on my website, asked for emails at check-out and offered an enewsletter. Turns out email has become the best way to reach the masses and build relationships with my customers.

4. Focus on the social platforms your customers actually use.

I leveraged social media correctly. After first creating my website, I jumped right into snagging similar handles on multiple networks. Bad move, Allie. Turns out, I only needed Facebook and Instagram. Once I lightened my load, I was able to give my business an online personality, post what my audience wanted to see and even invest in some advertising.

 

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/292584

On – 04 May, 2017 By Allie Decker

Why your Marketing should be YOURS and not rented from somewhere else

Generally speaking, digital marketers are pretty skilled ball-jugglers. We constantly balance competing deadlines, extract value out of less-than-ideal budgets, and generate instant search engine visibility under pressure.

We have a few tricks up our sleeve for doing that, including online ad networks such as Google AdWords, Facebook Advertising and LinkedIn Ads.

AdWords has been at the top of its game for the past 15 years for good reason – it offers a chance to be on Page 1 of Google in 15 minutes or less, and you only pay for actual eyeballs. Great deal, right?

In fact, using display ads, paid search or paid social as a way to generate instant results for brands or organizations is increasingly popular.

Don’t believe me? Wrap your head around these figures:

  • In its Q4 2016 fiscal year results, Google’s parent company Alphabet reported a whopping 17% increase in advertising revenue compared with the same period the year before.
  • When Facebook published its fourth quarter and end of year results, it also reported an increase in revenue from advertising, up 12% year on year.
  • Statista estimates we’ll all be spending more this year – with paid advertising expenditure soaring to $92.4 billion worldwide in 2017.
  • Marketers are now branching out to new ad formats, with the IAB calculating that mobile advertising grew massively in the first six months of 2016, with a total spend increase of 89% or $15.5 billion.

Big numbers, for sure, but are we missing a trick here?

While there may be plenty of plus points to paid advertising and paid social – and it most definitely plays a role in a well-executed marketing strategy – it might be time to take back ownership of your marketing.

I think so, anyway. In this blog, I’ll explain why you should own your marketing instead of renting it.

Ad space is rented, but content is owned

Getting the balance right between paid, earned and owned media is tricky, but in the long run, content is the clear winner.

That’s because whatever type of advertising you invest in – whether it’s sponsored posts on Facebook, Instagram adverts or a paid search campaign with Google – the space your advertising occupies is only rented.

This means that when your budget runs out, your advertising disappears.

Can you afford to have that happen?

Paid advertising is undeniably great for short-term visibility or when you need a last-minute fix to support other marketing efforts, but it creates the risk of leaving no digital footprint at all.

Investing your money in content, on the other hand, means that you’ll always have marketing assets that belong purely to you.

Sure, you may have to pay a copywriter or freelance blogger to draft up the relevant copy, but it will always be yours.

In other words, there’s no prospect of the gas meter running out or the lights suddenly switching off. This advantage is known as compound returns: it’s permanent rather than temporary.

Content can deliver better returns

According to Entrepreneur, content marketing has a better rate of return than many other forms of marketing. This makes sense when you consider the fact that once you have that piece of content in hand, there are no limits to how often you can re-use it, how widely you can share it, or how much you can repurpose it.

If you were to write an ebook for example, it’s easy to magnify that initial investment in content ownership to create multiple other assets. Off the top of my head, that might be:

  1. A blog post
  2. A podcast
  3. A slideshare
  4. A series of social media posts
  5. An infographic
  6. A landing page
  7. A lead generator
  8. A YouTube video

That’s eight different ways that owning your marketing can mean getting more from it. In contrast, if you put budget towards a paid ad campaign, the only way you can extend its reach and see your ad on other sites or in other formats is to spend more. It’s never really your own, whereas that ebook (and its eight possible uses) are.

You control your own spend

Paid advertising is just like property rental in that you have to pay the market rate. Whether that’s the cost per click in AdWords or the fixed fee to have your display ads run on a site of your choice, you are told how much you need to spend. There is no guarantee that your return will outstrip your spend, but you’re powerless to determine the going rate.

When you opt to own your marketing with content, you’re in the driver’s seat. You get to determine exactly how much time and how much money you spend. This gives you more flexibility and means your marketing can work for you, rather than placing a strain on your budget.

Guest Author: Sian Lenegan is a marketer and the managing director of Sixth Story, a branding and digital agency. Her focus is on helping businesses ignite growth through the power of branding.

Article Source: http://www.jeffbullas.com/2017/05/27/own-your-marketing/
On – 27 May, 2017 By Sian Lenegan